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to address the assembly at the opening of the term. nor own the role of foreign policy and the presidential campaign from washington journal this is 45 minutes. he is the former undersecretary of state from political affairs from 2005 to 2008. the george w. bush administration. he is teachly currently at the professor of diplomacy and international politics at harvard. thank you for joining us. >> it's a pleasure to be with you. >> thank you. you heard the speeches from new york and the play about the dualing foreign policy points. what's your take away as far as what each candidates had to say in new york? >> guest: first i think it's very interesting that foreign policy and national security issues have made a real come comeback. they are a big part of the discussion. i think it's a good thing because foreign policy is important to every single american. because we live in a globalized world. i thought president obama gave a thoughtful and he focused 0 the middle east and the tragic events that took place two weeks ago of this week. the assassination of our ambassador in libya and three o
interested in foreign policy and even issues like the defense budget? and that's why issues like that and the onces we don't know about that make me wary of all these straight line projections we're make in the future based on what things look like right now. >> anyone want to address the point? >> which point? >> the point about . >> pick on any of the points. i meant the point about iran and the likely hood we would enter in to military action there regardless of who wins. [inaudible] >> question from the audience? >> yes, sir. front row. >> microphone approaching you from the left. governor romney said he wants to create 12 million jobs during his term, that's 250,000 jobs a month. in the past, the u.s. has always been an exporter. and that was what created jobs. how do you see his promise of creating 12 million jobs in four years? >> unlikely. [laughter] >> okay. that's one view. anybody want to elaborate on that? >> look, i think we are in a completely different, you know, job market. we're about -- a few weeks during the convention which is bill clinton lineback in 1990 if
d date will focus on foreign policy. earlier this week the carnegie endowment for peace posted a discussion on the president's role in leading foreign policy. they talked about challenges facing the u.s. including american influence and engagement globally, the changing international order and emerging nations. two of the featured panelists included thomas friedman, "new york times" foreign affairs columnist and author of "the world is flat." and jessica mathews, carnegie president and director of national security office of global issues. >> good evening. my name is david rothkopf, and i will be the moderator for this evening. in the carnegie endowment discussion about how should the next american president engage the world. this is a debate format discussion. we have a terrific group of panelists here. starting on the far right we have professor john ikenberry of princeton. next is tom friedman of the new york times. next to him is our own jessica matthews of the carnegie endowment, and beside jessica is bob kagan at the brookings institution and we are going to cover several
handling his foreign policy correctly with respect to is ralph. >> sufficient and respectful to the jewish community. >> right. with respect specifically to his support for israel. then he said, well, i eventually met with president obama, and the very much solicited my support. i decided to support him again. >> your briefing it too quickly. >> i want to step in here because it was apparently just last week that you delivered a speech at a synagogue. today in michael good ones column i continue that discussion. the new york post. >> and this is a discussion in which your yet again critical of the obama administration. >> i have never seen a perfect candidate, and that never had a perfect and it. i wasn't perfect. and i will always speak out. but if you read the article today, my other utterances, it has always been stated that i am still on the obama train. i will explain why. >> we would definitely like you to do that. first specifically at think would you address last week was the question of the red line. >> not so much the red. >> tell us what you said last week. >> okay. i was incens
reach its foreign policy goals while under the wing of the united states which he says count always have israel's -- doesn't always have israel's best interests at heart. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> shalom, good evening, everybody. it is my pleasure to be here with you, especially when you have such great weather in washington. almost like jerusalem at this time of the year. i am very happy to see so many people coming and showing an interest in my book, and i would like in the next 20 minutes to share with you not what you're going to read in the book, but what's behind the ideas. but first i want to think we all can agree that's what's happening in israel is important to the people who live in the united states of america. why? because we share the same values, the same principles, the same heritage and the same enemies. and because we are in the middle east today being attacked, so you have to ask yourself why those people are against the jewish nation in the middle east. the arab against israel not because of the land that we so-called occupied. we are being attacked be
there as well. the united states foreign policy towards the persian gulf has for decades focused squarely on ensuring the free flow of oil from the gulf to the aborted and the soviet union but in recent decades. our concern to the region has embroiled us in the two wars in the past 20 years and led to a significant military commitment of military assets in the region and the question arises almost immediately why does the united states expand such efforts and so much of its assets. we are in fact a number three we'll producer in the world and when we import less than 20% of our crude imports from the gulf. so these issues we are going to explores the global energy market, the changing place changing is the persian gulf oil and gas still important and likely to be in the future where the shiastan index in the immediate region when the impact on the region's ability to produce. we have the very distinguished panelists. on my right, dr. jean-francois seznec currently adjunct professor at georgetown university. and for the previous ten years, dr. seznec was visiting professor of georgetown un
those made about the domestic and foreign policies. in the united states and in europe. their voices are not heard, even if they constitute 99% of the society's. human and ethical values are sacrificed in order to -- and their willingness to listen to the demands of the people has become only a two at a time in election. the current world order is -- and based on injustice. distinguished friends and colleagues, what should be done and what is the way out of the current situation? there is no doubt that the world is in need of a new order and a fresh way of thinking, in order in which man is recognized as god's supreme creation enjoying material and the spiritual qualities and possessing a divine nation filled with a desire to see justice. an order that aims to revive human dignity and believes in universal happiness and perfection. three, in order which is at peace, security and welfare for all walks of life around the globe. four, in order found upon trust in order. rulers must love -- five, a just and fair order in which everybody is equal before love and in which there is no -- le
of american public opinion on foreign policy which just came out recently there were some very strange attitudes of americans regarding the middle east. there was a large majority of people saw the middle east as the region of the world most likely to create threats to the national security of the united states. and yet there was a general trend of wanting less involvement militarily, economically and so forth with this region. so i think along with what damon said, public opinion and how voters and citizens feel about the involvement of their countries in the middle east is another issue. >> certain detail, very tricky dick the european union is going to disappear. it will continue without any doubt, even the eurozone. this is my position. now, for us, that part of the world, this part of the world we are talking about, is our neighborhood, southern neighborhood. and, therefore, the stability there is for migration, many things are related to that, mediterranean sea. so for us has to be a priority. and it will be a priority for ever. we will do it properly. we will do it properly, do
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8